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Frankincense and Myrrh
Frankincense and Myrrh
Introduction Frankincense and myrrh both grow as small trees or shrubs. Their natural habitat is limited to the southern part of the Arabian Peninsula (The Dhofar region) and to northeast Africa (Ethiopia and Somalia). A different species of myrrh grows naturally in the Indian sub continent and frankincense is widely cultivated in parts of southern China. Frankincense and Myrrh Frankincense...
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Branches, Roots, Leaves, Fruit and Flowers that Cross Property Boundaries
Branches, Roots, Leaves, Fruit and Flowers that Cross Property Boundaries
Introduction There is no requirement in law per se for a tree owner to prevent a tree or part of a tree crossing over a property boundary; however, conditional rights are given to neighbours to prevent or abate a nuisance or trespass. Nuisance When a tree growing on land owned by ‘A’ is indirectly interfering with the ‘use or enjoyment’ of land owned by ‘B’,...
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West Country Apples, Orchards and Cider
West Country Apples, Orchards and Cider
Fresh off the Press West Country Apples, Orchards and Cider The West Country is synonymous with apples, orchards and traditional farmhouse cider. Although cider is presently enjoying a revival in popularity, all is not well. The National Trust have said 90% of England's traditional orchards have disappeared in the last 60 years, with older varieties often uprooted and the land used for...
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A World History of Rubber
A World History of Rubber
Rubber is elastic and water-resistant, it floats and doesn't conduct electricity. As latex it is used to make adhesives, contraceptives and tennis balls for Wimbledon; when vulcanised (nothing to do with Star Trek) it is used to make tyres, wellington boots and artificial hearts. The Rubber Tree The rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis) is native to the rain forest of Brazil. The sap or latex...
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A Brief History of Tea
A Brief History of Tea
The Birth of Tea in China According to legend, in 2737 BC, the Chinese Emperor Shen Nung was sitting beneath a tree while his servant boiled some drinking water, when a few leaves from the tree fell into the cooking pot. The tree was a Camellia sinensis (sinensis is Chinese for ‘of China’). Today there are over 3,000 different types of tea in the world and they are all produced from...
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